Crumbs! What a nice idea!


Your toaster is an essential kitchen appliance, but after virtually every use, you will find crumbs on the countertop.

This tray catches most of them – and saves you quite a bit of cleaning up.

The beauty is also that this tray is very simple in design and easy to make. The only thing you need to bear in mind is that toasters vary in size, shape and design, so you need to ensure that the tray you make is bespoke for your toaster.

When deciding on your tray’s dimensions, ensure that you allow at least 15mm on each end and both sides, to allow for air circulation around the toaster. If there is not enough space for air to flow, as your toaster toasts your breakfast slices, it could overheat. You also need to allow space for the toaster’s power cord where it exits the underside of the toaster and for any controls, such as the release button and temperature setting knob.

In this instance, the toaster is 350mm x 120mm, so the tray’s inner dimensions are 380mmx 150mm and its total outer dimensions are 390mm x160mm.

Your toaster is an essential kitchen appliance, but after virtually every use, you will find crumbs on the countertop.

This tray catches most of them – and saves you quite a bit of cleaning up.

The beauty is also that this tray is very simple in design and easy to make. The only thing you need to bear in mind is that toasters vary in size, shape and design, so you need to ensure that the tray you make is bespoke for your toaster.

When deciding on your tray’s dimensions, ensure that you allow at least 15mm on each end and both sides, to allow for air circulation around the toaster. If there is not enough space for air to flow, as your toaster toasts your breakfast slices, it could overheat. You also need to allow space for the toaster’s power cord where it exits the underside of the toaster and for any controls, such as the release button and temperature setting knob.

In this instance, the toaster is 350mm x 120mm, so the tray’s inner dimensions are 380mmx 150mm and its total outer dimensions are 390mm x160mm.

Method:

  1. Measure the toaster
  2. Here are the basic materials; not shown are the brass screws. I was lucky and was able to use a length of plywood left over from an earlier project – it pays to keep your bigger offcuts.
  3. Here are the basic materials; not shown are the brass screws. I was lucky and was able to use a length of plywood left over from an earlier project – it pays to keep your bigger offcuts.
  4. Mark off the beading lengths for the tray base frame.
  5. Cut it as accurately as you can for a neat result. Try square off each end rather than mitring it; it’s easier, and the frame is invisible once the tray is in use.
  6. Cut it as accurately as you can for a neat result. Try square off each end rather than mitring it; it’s easier, and the frame is invisible once the tray is in use.
  7. However, try mitre the ends of the sides for neat corners.
  8. The sides and ends cut and ready to be glued into position.
  9. Glue the sides into position first, using clamps to hold them in place while the glue cures. (Ignore the prop – that is just to hold the tray up for the photograph.)
  10. I actually cut the ends a millimetre or two long and then trim them down to the right length
  11. Clamping the ends across the corners as shown here, will ensure that they are exactly in line with the sides.
  12. Once the glue has cured, drill 2mm pilot holes for the screws. They are 4mm up from the bottom edge of the side and 30mm in from the corner. The pilot hole will ensure that when you drive the screw in, the beading will not split (as will making the holes 4mm up from the bottom of the beading). Try using four screws per side and two per end.
  13. Driving in the screws – slow and careful is the way to go.
  14. If you are going to leave the screw heads as is, you will get a neater finish if you ensure that the slots in the heads are horizontal or vertical, so that they match.
  15. Drive the screws in just down to the bottom of the slot and then carefully file them down and then sand them so that it would create a rivet effect. After a final sanding, apply a couple of coats of clear gloss varnish.
  16. Finally, add a felt pad to each corner to prevent any scratches on the countertop. Job done!

Final shot…

Crumbs! What crumbs?

Panel:

These materials are available at Selected Mica Stores. To find out which is your closest Mica and whether or not they stock the items required, please go to www.mica.co.za, find your store and call them. If your local Mica does not stock exactly what you need they will be able to order it for you or suggest an alternative product or a reputable source.

Project guide

TIME: an afternoon

COST: R30

Skill: 1

Assistant: No           

Tools required:

Jigsaw, craft knife, random orbital sander, cordless or mains drill/driver.